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Dickinson in Japan
Nagoya, Japan (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms: Academic Year,
Fall,
Spring
Homepage: Click to visit
Budget Sheets Academic Year,
Fall,
Spring
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Fall 2015 11/01/2014 12/01/2014 TBA TBA
Academic Year 2015-2016 11/01/2014 12/01/2014 TBA TBA
Fact Sheet:
Language of Instruction: English, Japanese
Class Eligibility:
2-Sophomore, 3-Junior, 4-Senior (fall only)
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Housing Options:
Dorms, Family Stay
Maximum Credits Earned (per semester): 4.5 Academic Area of Study: Anthropology, East Asian Studies, Economics, History, International Studies, Japanese, Political Science, Religion, Sociology
Foreign Laguage Prerequisite:
4 semesters (college) of instructional language
Program Description:

Dickinson's partner institution, Nanzan University, is located in Nagoya, Japan's third-largest urban center. Along with studying the Japanese language, program participants take politics, folklore, religion, literature and history courses taught in English. Courses in traditional Japanese arts, such as calligraphy and woodblock printing, also are offered. Students may study at Nanzan for a semester or academic year and may live in on-campus residence halls or with a Japanese host family.

Nagoya, in southcentral Japan, is the nation's third largest city, with more than 8 million residents living in the greater metropolitan area. The city is served by Japan's famous "bullet trains" or shinkansen, located on a line that runs between Tokyo and Osaka. One of the city's most famous landmarks is Nagoya Castle, which was built by the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu for his ninth son.

Nanzan University

Nagoya

Nanzan University, Japan's second-largest Catholic university, was founded in 1946 as a college for foreign-language study and has grown into a university famous for its language programs.

Along with studying the Japanese language, program participants take politics, folklore, religion, literature and history courses taught in English. Courses in traditional Japanese arts, such as calligraphy and wood-block printing, also are offered, giving students additional creative opportunities to learn about Japanese culture.

Most program participants attend courses at the Center for Japanese Studies, but advanced students of Japanese may enroll in regular classes at Nanzan, which are taught exclusively in the host language.

To read more about what our students think about their experiences in Japan, check out the '10 Nanzan Summer Program blog by clicking here.

Academics

The Dickinson in Japan program is language intensive and is designed to advance the skills of students at all levels, from intermediate to advanced. Language courses are conducted in the morning; in the afternoon, students take lecture courses taught in English that deal with cultural, political and economic issues.

Language courses include:

  • Elementary Japanese
  • Pre-Intermediate Japanese
  • Intermediate Japanese
  • Pre-Advanced Japanese
  • Advanced Japanese
 

Courses in Japanese area studies include:

  • Japanese Business
  • Japanese Culture
  • Japanese History
  • Japanese Foreign Policy
  • Japanese Economy
  • Japanese Culture and Art
  • Japanese Non-Profit Sector
  • Japanese Literature
  • Japanese Politics
  • Japanese Religions
  • Japanese Society
 

Seminars for advanced speakers include:

  • Classical Japanese
  • Elementary Translation
  • Intermediate Translation
  • Readings in the Social Sciences
  • Readings in Japanese Literature
  • Japanese Writing
  • Introduction to Creative Writing

Students who successfully complete a semester in Nagoya receive up to 4.5 Dickinson credits. Those who complete a full year receive up to nine Dickinson credits.

MiyajimaEligibility

3.0 GPA
Students must complete at least two years of college-level Japanese before studying abroad.

All students must have a declared major at the time of application.

As a part of the review process students’ conduct records and account status are also reviewed.  Students and their parents should note that the review process takes all elements of the student’s academic record into consideration and that even if a student has the required minimum GPA and language pre-requisites, he or she may not be admitted.

Students who have questions about the review process or their particular candidacy for a program should come into the Center for Global Study and Engagement for advising.

Center staff will not discuss students’ applications with parents, friends or any other party without the student’s consent and presence in the conversation

How is instruction different?

Instructor/student relationships are very different in Japan from those in the U.S. In Japan, students show great respect toward the instructor at all times. This means students are expected to dress appropriately, and activities such as eating, drinking, gum chewing, and wearing a hat are strictly prohibited during class. Class attendance is expected. If you must be absent, even in the event of illness, you must inform the Center for Japanese Studies.

What classes are available?

The Center for Japanese Studies offers four basic types of courses. Successful completion of courses in the Japanese Language (8 Nanzan credits) will be transferred as two (2) Dickinson credits. Each successfully completed special seminar (2 Nanzan credits), will be transferred as one (1) Dickinson credit. Each course in Japanese Area Studies (3 Nanzan credits) will be transferred as one (1) Dickinson credit. Practical courses in the Japanese Arts (2 Nanzan credits) will be transferred as one-half (.5) Dickinson credit.

Courses and guidelines for studying at the Center for Japanese Studies.

When will I register for classes?

Students will take a language placement exam in their first days at Nanzan. Most Dickinson students place into IJ400, and occasionally some place into IJ500. Students who place into IJ200 do not receive Dickinson credit for the course because the material has already been covered at Dickinson. Although the Center for Japanese Studies will allow a student whose placement is IJ200 to enroll in the IJ300 course, students need to realize that there is a danger of failing IJ300 if the language is an obstacle. It is better to take the IJ200 course for no credit and build a solid basis for success in IJ300 in the second semester, for which a student will earn credit. After a few weeks into the semester, a second placement exam is given to allow students to change their language course if desired.

Students are advised to review and prepare for the placement exams prior to arrival. You will have written tests. During the first week of classes, students are allowed to visit a higher level course to assess whether they have sufficient language skill to succeed in that level.

Will the courses count towards my major?

Consult with your major adviser prior to choosing courses.

Will they count in my GPA?

For courses taken at the Center for Japanese Studies, course titles and letter grades earned are recorded on the Dickinson transcript, but the grade is not computed in the GPA. To receive credit you must earn a grade equivalent to a Dickinson ‘C’ (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) or above. A grade of ‘C-’ or below will not earn credit.

what is a full course load and How will my courses transfer?

The Center for Japanese Studies offers four basic types of courses. Successful completion of courses in the Japanese Language (8 Nanzan credits) will be transferred as two (2) Dickinson credits. Each successfully completed special seminar (2 Nanzan credits), will be transferred as one (1) Dickinson credit. Each course in Japanese Area Studies (3 Nanzan credits) will be transferred as one (1) Dickinson credit. Practical courses in the Japanese Arts (2 Nanzan credits) will be transferred as one-half (.5) Dickinson credit.

A normal full-time course load is four Dickinson course credits each semester. Students may not under-enroll under any circumstances.

Dickinson students may receive up to a maximum of 4.5 course credits per one semester. Students must take one Japanese language course (equal to 2 course credits), two content courses (seminars or Japanese Area Studies courses), and an optional 0.5 credit course in Japanese arts. Students may not take more than one (1) course per semester in the traditional Japanese arts.

To take more than 4.5 credits per semester, a student must petition the Director of Education Abroad. If a student registers for more than the maximum courses allowed without permission from the committee, the On-campus Coordinator, their academic advisor at Dickinson, and the Center for Global Study and Engagement, the course credit will not transfer. Students will also be responsible for any additional fees for doing this.

Only liberal arts classes will qualify for transfer credit.

Generally speaking, courses must have an equivalent at Dickinson. Exceptions include classes that focus on the culture and/or history of the country in which the student is studying.

Transfer credit will not be awarded for coursework that duplicates what a student has already completed at Dickinson.

For courses taken at the Center for Japanese Studies, course titles and letter grades earned are recorded on the Dickinson transcript, but the grade is not computed in the GPA. To receive credit you must earn a grade equivalent to a Dickinson ‘C’ (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) or above. A grade of ‘C-’ or below will not earn credit.

Students must consult with the on-campus coordinator, Professor Meguro, before the course registration period is over.

Is there a language requirement?

Students must complete at least two years of college-level Japanese before studying abroad.

Students are encouraged to practice the Japanese language as much as possible in and out of the classroom. Early on, students should discuss with their host families their desire to speak Japanese only during the home stay. If members of the family want to practice their English, and they usually will, insist that a certain time be set aside for the “English lessons.”

Does this program include any group travel once I’m in country?

No, it does not.  Participants in this program may choose, on an individual basis, to participate in excursions organized by the Center for Japanese Studies at Nanzan.  In many cases these excursions are free for visiting international students; however, some excursions require an additional fee for which the student must pay out-of-pocket.Japan

What expenses are covered during excursions?

Students’ costs will be covered according to the excursion detail.  Students should inquire with the CJS for more information on what is included.

When will I find out where and when we’re travelling?

Specific dates and locations for the CJS excursions offered will be announced throughout the semester.

Can a friend or family member who is not on the program also travel with us?

No, unfortunately, for logistical and academic reasons non-program participants are not able to join in program excursions.

Are excursions optional?

Yes, they are optional.

When is orientation? 

In addition to the full day mandatory pre-departure orientation you’ll have on campus, there will be an on-site orientation for this program.  In Nagoya, students’ on-site orientation occurs the week before classes begin and is run through Nanzan University’s Center for Japanese Studies (CJS).  The orientation is comprehensive and is designed especially for international students studying at Nanzan.

Orientation events include a tour of campus, an overview of Nagoya’s public transportation system, university and course registration meetings, and an overview of your health and safety while studying in Japan.

What are the program dates?

Students on this program will be given a date when they must arrive at Nanzan University.  This information will be detailed in your offer letter and preparation materials sent from Nanzan.  You must communicate your arrival plans with the faculty coordinator and the CGSE.  To notify the CGSE, you should enter the flight information in your on line program accessible here.  Also, students must comply with all information requests from the CJS so they are aware of your plans.  Students may choose to arrive at Nagoya’s main international airport (NGO) or to fly into Japan through another port of entry and take the train to Nagoya.  Official dates for the program can be found here.

Is there a group flight?

No, there is not a group flight organized for this program.  Students must make their own travel arrangements after confirming the appropriate arrival dates.  Students may wish to book their travel on their own or use Advantage Travel based in Syracuse, New York.  We recommend students contact agent Sally Curtis at Advantage Travel by calling 1-800-788-1980 or emailing scurtis@advantagecny.com.  Although flights can be booked online, we strongly encourage students and their families to consider the benefits of an agent’s services given the duration of study abroad programs and the complexity of international air travel today.

What if my family wants to visit me?

If you have family or friends who are planning to visit you, please do not make travel plans until you arrive at the program and become familiar with your class schedule and any Nanzan University excursions wish to participate in.  It is not acceptable to skip class for personal travel.  Please note that many courses at Nanzan University have an attendance policy—student absenteeism is factored into course grades.

When will I have time to travel?

The CJS offers group academic excursions for international students throughout the year and all participants are provided with a stipend from Dickinson to help cover fees with some of the excursions and activities if they wish to participate.  Many students also travel on their own during major Japanese holidays and school breaks when classes are not in session.

Can I arrive early or stay after the program ends?

Students may not arrive early or stay late in Nanzan organized accommodations.  Students may wish to arrange for their own lodging and do so at their own expense.  You should also consider your visa validity when you make the decision of whether or not you may arrive early or stay late.  No student may arrive late for the start of the program.

How much does the program cost?

Click here for the program budget sheet.  It can be found at the top of the page to the left of the Apply Now button.

What is included in the program fee?

The fee includes tuition, room, board, academic excursions and emergency insurance.  Airfare and visa fees are not included.  The budget sheet also lists additional fees students should anticipate.

Is my flight included?

The flight is not included but the cost is taken into consideration when your financial aid need is calculated for your semester abroad.

How much extra money do I need to bring?

This depends on you.  We encourage students to not travel every weekend, but to really engage their host city in meaningful ways during their semester abroad.  An estimate of personal expenses is included on the budget sheet, but it really depends on you and your spending habits.

Will I receive a stipend?

JapanYes, a stipend allowance to cover food, transportation, National Health Insurance, and internet will be wired to you at the beginning of the semester.  During the Center for Japanese Studies orientation, students will learn how to open a Japanese bank account at Nagoya Ginkoo- The Bank of Nagoya.  As soon as your bank account is active, you should e-mail the contact information for the bank and your bank account number to Professor Akiko Meguro.  When we receive this information, your first semester living allowance can be transferred directly into your Japanese bank account.  For specific information please see the Dickinson in Japan handbook.

How will I access my money in Nagoya?

You will have easy access to your stipend money with a cash card from the Japanese bank where you will open an account.  Your parents will also be able to send funds directly into your account by wire transfer.  Banks are not open for transactions on weekends, holidays, or in the evenings.  There are very limited possibilities in which you may use an ATM card to access a U.S. bank account.  However, past participants have noted that some convenience stores have ATMs, in which your bankcard may work.  You may also withdraw money at the post office or at the Citibank in Sakae, where most foreign cards will be accepted. 

Can I work part time?

There are no work-study opportunities in Nagoya.  If you are interested in earning money, you may be able to do so through private tutoring, however, students may need to get permission for part-time work from Nanzan University (Center for Japanese Studies).  Since permission will depend on the quality of the student’s academic work, permission cannot be given before October or November.  This means that working part-time is only possible in the second semester, not in the first semester.

How do I access health care in Nagoya?

NagoyaYou will be enrolled in the Japanese National Health Care Insurance system that will cover you for routine medical care.  If you get sick, ask your host family for the name of a doctor.  You will have to pay the required fee for the Japanese National Health Care system.  Usually, you can see a doctor on a walk-in basis without making an appointment.  Visits to the dentist require an appointment.  Most doctors are general practitioners, as are most dentists.  Since there are no private practices, any visit to the doctor will mean a visit to the hospital.  If you need to use your U.S. primary health insurance policy in addition to the Japanese coverage, you should be prepared to pay cash and get receipts to present to your U.S. insurer for reimbursement.

What if I become seriously ill?

Japan has excellent health care including emergency medical care.  If you become seriously ill your host family will help you find a good doctor.  The staff at Nanzan will also be able to assist you.

For more information about health and insurance abroad, please click here.

Housing

Students can live either in a dormitory at Nanzan for international students or live with a host family.  Living with a host family will enable you to practice your language ability on a day-to-day basis.  Most families who offer to host a foreign student have probably done so before, and they will help you adjust to living in a new environment. For a more enhanced immersion experience into daily Japanese life and the greatest opportunity to use their Japanese language skills, Dickinson encourages students to live with a host family.

What type of housing is available in Nagoya?

There two types of housing available on the Nanzan program.  Students should carefully consider these options and talk to returning students about their experiences.  See "Contacts" to talk with a global ambassador or visit the center to make contact with program alums.

Option 1: Dormitories for International Students.

Dormitories open a day before orientation sessions start, but students can get into them a few days earlier by making arrangements with the Center for Japanese Studies.  The Center will also arrange pick up at the airport and transportation to the dormitory for students.  Students living in the dorms can eat in cafeterias and restaurants near the University.  You are expected to comply with all dormitory rules regarding hours, laundry, recycling, energy conservation, visitors, and other matters.

Option 2: Host Family

Probably the greatest experience you will have while studying in Japan is living with a host family.  Since you have chosen to study abroad and learn a foreign language, living with a host family will enable you to practice your language ability on a day-to-day basis.  Most families who offer to host a foreign student have probably done so before, and they will help you adjust to living in a new environment.

You will have your own room with a bed or futon, bedding, and a small closet.  Be diligent in observing house rules and keeping your room neat.

The most important thing to remember in order to make your stay with a Japanese family an enjoyable experience is to always be polite and respectful with every member of your host family.  Remember you are living in their home and should abide by their rules.  Some host families may enforce a curfew.

You should let your family know where you are at all times; it is a good idea to leave a copy of your class schedule with them.  Respectful salutations are expected; whenever you leave the house, you should say itte kimasu.  Whenever you enter the house, say tadaima.

When do I find out about my housing?

Housing arrangements are made by the Housing Section at Nanzan University.  You will be contacted about housing after you are accepted to the program. You may direct all questions or concerns about your housing assignment to the Housing Section Office at cie-housing@ic.nanzan-u.ac.jp.

What are the meal arrangements in Nagoya?

Those students living with homestay families will be provided 14 meals a week by the family.  Part of your stipend will be used to pay for lunch and transportation to Nanzan University (see Finances).  The Center for Japanese Studies will wire money to the host family to cover your stay.

There is no board plan available at Nanzan University.  Those students living in the dorm will receive money from the Center for Japanese Studies for food.

Internship opportunities are not available on this program.

 

Can I conduct research abroad?

Students may conduct research abroad under the guidance of a Dickinson advisor. The Student International Research Fund (SIRF) was established to help students with extra travel costs associated with independent research projects.  Students are encouraged to present their research at the International Research Symposium when they return to campus.  For more information, click here.

What is a visa?

A visa is a document, normally affixed within your passport, which allows you to enter the country and stay for the duration of your program.  The requirements for the visa and visa process are controlled by the government of the country you are entering, are non-negotiable, and can change regularly.  If you arrive without the proper visa, you will be sent home by immigration officers at your own expense.

Do I need a visa?

A student visa is required to participate in the Nagoya program.  If you do not hold a U.S. passport, you should consult with the Japanese embassy in your country of citizenship for the student visa requirements. Obtaining a student visa is the student’s responsibility. We will review the guidelines for obtaining a student visa at the Pre-departure Orientation.

We have produced visa guidelines to provide you with an overview of what you will need to do to obtain a student visa.  Please note: this is only a tool to help you get started!  It is not a substitute for consulting with the Japanese consulate that has jurisdiction over your state of home residence.  Make sure you are familiar with the most up-to-date regulations by visiting their website frequently.

Also, you need to ensure that your passport is valid for 6 months after the program end date.

How do I get a visa?

You will need to make an appointment at the Japanese consulate in order to submit previously-gathered documents that are required for the visa. Please consult the Visa Guidelines for your country of study.

Do I have to go to the consulate/embassy?

There are two options: 1- you can make a visa appointment at the Japanese consulate in New York City or the Japanese consulate that presides over your home state jurisdiction and submit your student visa application. Or 2- you can mail your documents to the Japanese consulate in New York City or the Japanese consulate that presides over your home state jurisdiction for application submission.

How much does a visa cost?

Currently, there is no visa fee for study visas; however this is subject to change.  Be sure to check the consulate’s website for any fee change before you submit your visa paperwork.

How long does it take to receive my visa?

At the New York consulate, it can take at least a week to obtain a student visa.

If I’m not a U.S. passport holder, are there any additional requirements?

Yes, you will need to do your own research on visa requirements for citizens of your home country to study in Japan. The CGSE may be able to help you with the required documents. Also, you will need to inform Marlee Meikrantz and Jackie Wong that you will be studying outside of the United States and discuss how you will remain in valid F-1 status during your studies abroad.

May I use a visa service to get a visa?

Yes, there may be visa services that can assist you in obtaining the student visa.  You will need to research these providers and their fees and timetables.

Will the Center help me with the visa?

Yes, we provide you with visa guidelines, as well as various required documents needed for the visa process.

Global Ambassadors are returning study abroad students who serve as peer advisors for their program. Please feel free to contact them for a student perspective!

Chris Ivimey
ivimeyc@dickinson.edu

Chris Ivimey Japan
I studied at Nanzan University, located in Nagoya, Japan. The Center for Japanese Studies there was a wonderful experience that greatly enriched my education as an East Asian Studies major. In order to prepare myself for a career in International Relations and living abroad, I participated in a wide variety of things ranging from a mixed chorus club to visiting various temples. Having been based in Nagoya, I was also able to catch a glimpse of the economic identity of the region, visiting the various auto plants and regional “quirks” that gave Nagoya its own character. The favorite experience I ever had, however, came from working at my host mother’s English conversation school. I attended a local community festival with my host mother and one of her students, the three of us switching between English and Japanese fluidly in order to explain difficult grammar and vocabulary to the student.

 

Contacts

Prof. Alex Bates, On-Campus Coordinator
Department of East Asian Studies
Dickinson College
P.O. Box 1773
Carlisle, PA 17013-2896
Phone: (717) 245-1127
E-mail:  batesa@dickinson.edu

Senior Lecturer Akiko Meguro
Department of East Asian Studies
Dickinson College
P.O. Box 1773
Carlisle, PA 17013-2896
Email: meguroa@dickinson.edu

Advisors (Please call for an appointment)

Center for Global Study and Engagement
Dickinson College
717-245-1341
global@dickinson.edu

On-Site Administration

The program is administered by the Center for Japanese Studies at Nanzan University, which provides on-site support and advisement to students.